Car and van CO2 targets: Charging infrastructure essential to meet member state ambition

Brussels, 29 June 2022 – To meet the extremely ambitious CO2 reduction goals agreed last night by European environment ministers, the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) is calling for drastic action on charging infrastructure.

ACEA respects the Council’s decision but points out that it comes with major implications, not only for the auto industry but also for the EU economy as a whole.

European automobile manufacturers have long embraced the shift to electromobility and are radically transforming their businesses to meet the EU’s climate goals. However, the key to reaching CO2 targets is not in the industry’s hands alone – others need to play their part too.

It is now vital that all the framework conditions for going fully electric are put in place – including the roll-out of a truly EU-wide network of charging and refuelling infrastructure and access to the necessary raw materials.

“To be very clear: the automobile industry will fully contribute to the goal of a carbon-neutral Europe in 2050. But the decision of the Council raises significant questions which have not yet been answered, such as how Europe will ensure strategic access to the key raw materials for e-mobility,” stated Oliver Zipse, ACEA President and CEO of BMW.

“If the EU wants to be a pioneer of sustainable mobility, the availability of these materials must be secured. Otherwise, we will be threatened with new dependencies, as other economic regions have already positioned themselves at an early stage.” 

“Going forward, technology openness means that also hydrogen and other CO2-neutral fuels can play an important role in decarbonising road transport,” he added.

In the context of the ongoing negotiations on the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Regulation (AFIR), ACEA also urges policy makers to match the ambitions that they have just set for the auto industry when it comes to fixing infrastructure targets for each member state.

The interim review of the CO2 regulation will be key to track progress on market developments, infrastructure deployment and the availability of raw materials. 

European automobile manufacturers have long embraced the shift to electromobility and are radically transforming their businesses to meet the EU’s climate goals. However, the key to reaching CO2 targets is not in the industry’s hands alone.

Notes for editors

About ACEA

  • The European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) represents the 16 major Europe-based car, van, truck and bus makers: BMW Group, DAF Trucks, Daimler Truck, Ferrari, Ford of Europe, Honda Motor Europe, Hyundai Motor Europe, Iveco Group, Jaguar Land Rover, Mercedes-Benz, Renault Group, Stellantis, Toyota Motor Europe, Volkswagen Group, Volvo Cars, and Volvo Group.
  • Visit www.acea.auto for more information about ACEA, and follow us on www.twitter.com/ACEA_auto or www.linkedin.com/company/ACEA/.
  • Contact: Cara McLaughlin, Communications Director, cm@acea.auto, +32 485 88 66 47.

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About the EU automobile industry

  • 13 million Europeans work in the auto industry (directly and indirectly), accounting for 7% of all EU jobs.
  • 11.5% of EU manufacturing jobs – some 3.4 million – are in the automotive sector.
  • Motor vehicles are responsible for €374.6 billion of tax revenue for governments across key European markets.
  • The automobile industry generates a trade surplus of €79.5 billion for the EU.
  • The turnover generated by the auto industry represents more than 8% of the EU’s GDP.
  • Investing €58.8 billion in R&D annually, the automotive sector is Europe’s largest private contributor to innovation, accounting for 32% of total EU spending.
Content type Press release
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